Lithography

direct-write-laser-system-for-chrome-mask-production2Direct write laser system for chrome mask production

The Heidelberg µPG101 is a direct write laser system used to write photolithography chrome masks. The system has a maximum write resolution of 2 µm and a maximum write area of 125 mm x 150 mm. The system can write to 5” and 7” chrome masks.

ANFF-Q will write designs on request, develop, etch, clean, inspect and ship masks to your location.

Examples of use:

The system can be used for applications such as MEMS, bio MEMS, integrated optics, microfluidics, sensors, actuators, MOEMS, material research, nanotubes, graphene, and any other application that requires high precision, high-resolution microstructures.

Purpose:

Direct laser writer for creating high resolution 2D patterns on chrome masks.

Material systems:

UV curable polymers on chrome coated soda lime substrates.

Scale/volume:

Writes to 5” and 7” masks.

Specifications/resolution:

Mode 1: Write area 90 mm x 90 mm with a resolution of 2 µm

Mode 2: Write area 125 mm x 150 mm with a resolution of 5 µm

Model:

Heidelberg µPG101

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

Class 1 000 cleanroom, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Doug Mair


form-2-sla-3d-printer2Form 2 (SLA) 3D printer

Formlab’s Form 2 is a straightforward and easy to use desktop stereolithography (SLA) system that allows you to print 3D objects with resolutions down to 25 µm (vertical resolution).

Examples of use

The Form 2 allows you to reliably print quality components. The Form 2 can be used in prototyping and part design as well as to create niche items for immediate use. Uses range from biomedical and dental applications through to parts manufacture and jewellery.

Purpose:

To create 3D structures.

Material systems:

A range of methacrylate photopolymer resins, including castable, flexible, tough and biocompatible resins.

Scale/volume:

Build volume: 145 × 145 × 175 mm

Specifications/resolution:

Layer thickness: 25 – 100 µm

Laser spot size: 140 µm

Laser power: 250 mW

Model:

Form 2

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

PC2 Lab, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Lien Chau


Hexamethyldisilizane (HMDS) oven

In order to improve photoresist adhesion to silicon and glass it is necessary to prime the surface of the substrate before spin coating the photoresist. Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) is a common primer for this purpose. The HMDS oven allows vapour phase deposition of the HMDS to create a hydrophobic surface for photoresist to bond to. The process involves a dehydration bake of the substrate at 150oC to drive off moisture to create a stable surface which is then primed.
HMDS is particularly important when fabricating small features or high aspect ratio features.
Note: HMDS is not effective when using SU8 photoresist – Ti Prime can be used instead.

Purpose:

To improve photoresist adhesion to silicon and glass.

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

Class 10 000 cleanroom, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Doug Mair


hot-embosser2Hot embosser

Hot embossing is a micro replication process that replicates a microstructured master, sometimes referred as a mould insert or a stamp, in polymer. The embossing process involves pressing the stamp onto a material, usually thermal plastic, and heating up the material to its glass transition temperature while applying hydraulic pressure. This process replicates the microstructures on the material, which is then allowed to cool and removed from the stamp.

The EVG520IS semi-automated single-chamber hot embossing unit handles wafers up to 150 mm with semi-automated operation for small volume production applications. The equipment is custom designed to have maximum temperature of 650 °C and pressure up to 60 kN.

The EVG520IS features EV Group’s proprietary symmetric rapid heating and a cooling chuck design. The key advantages of the EVG hot embosser are an independent top and bottom side heater, a high pressure bonding capability and same material and process flexibility. The EVG520IS is also equipped with anodic bonding facility for packaging glass and silicon wafers. This additional feature is capable of monitoring bonding continuously displaying bond parameters with a high resolution display of the bond current down to 20 μA resolution and a high voltage power supply of 2 000 V/50 mA. The bond parameters, including current, can be adjusted using a software interface.

Examples of use:

The EVG520IS system can be used in hot embossing of thermal plastics, nanoimprint lithography, and wafer to wafer bonding for MEMS and packaging devices.

Purpose:

Stamping of a pattern into a polymer substrate softened by raising the temperature just above its glass transition temperature primarily for defining micro channels and wells for fluidic devices. A wide variety of polymers can be used to hot emboss.

Bonding of wafers, such as fusion bonding (silicon to silicon), anodic bonding (Pyrex to silicon), eutectic bonding (Si to Si with metal), and adhesive assisted bonding.

Material systems:

Polymers with glass transition temperature below 650 °C, silicon, pyrex wafers.

Scale/volume:

  • Stamp size and substrate size up to 150 mm (6 inch).
  • One sample at a time.
  • Minimum wafer diameter: 80 mm.
  • Fully-automated single chamber processing with manual loading and unloading including external cooling station.

Specifications/resolution:

  • Semi-automated system with temperatures of up to 650 °C and 60 kN pressure.
  • Rapid substrate cooling.
  • Fully automated bond process execution and bond cover movements with multi-stack bonding option.
  • Integrated top and bottom side cooling station for high throughput.
  • Bond chuck system/alignment system: 100 mm and 150 mm wafer using EVG620
  • Maximum contact force: up to 60 kN
  • Maximum temperature: 650°C
  • Vacuum: 10 – 3 mbar
  • Power supply for anodic bonding: 0 – 2.000 V/50 mA

Model:

EVG520IS

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

Class 1 000 cleanroom, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Lien Chau


lithography-suiteLithography suite

The lithography suite at ANFF-Q’s Griffith University site is set for processing micron features using positive and reverse image photoresist.

All processes are recipe driven ensuring consistent quality processing for full wafers. Typical resist thickness uniformity for 150 mm wafer = <+/- 0.5 %. Sub-micron lithography capability has been shown.

The lithography suite of equipment provides the complete process flow for industrial standard processing, i.e. priming, coating, softbake, exposing, developing and hardbake.

Although the suite is set for 150 mm, processing smaller wafers and fragment processing is also possible.

For more detailed specifications and capabilities of the lithography equipment see pdf files at Queensland Microtechnology Facility and Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre.

Purpose:

Commercial standard photoresist patterning for device fabrication.

Material systems:

Si wafers.

Scale/volume:

150 mm manual handling and wafer fragments.

Specifications/resolution:

Recipe driven processing ensuring consistent quality resist 1 µm thick coating, non uniformity < +/- 0.5 % with 3 mm edge exclusion, achieved resolution: 1 µm lines and spaces with 86 ° profile on targeted features.

Site

Griffith University

Location:

QMF (Bldg N74), Nathan Campus

Instrument Contact:

Glenn Walker


“A microneedle integrated with a microfluidic channel” Credit to Dr Zahra Faraji Rad
“A microneedle integrated with a microfluidic channel” Credit to Dr Zahra Faraji Rad

Microfluidics

Microfluidics is the science and technology of controlling and manipulating fluids at the submillimetre scale. Precise control of fluids and rapid sample processing in an assay has made microfluidic technologies an attractive candidate to replace traditional experimental approaches. The fluid phenomena that dominate liquids at this length scale are measurably different from those that dominate at the macroscale. For example, the relative effect of the force produced by gravity at microscale dimensions is greatly reduced compared to its dominance at the macroscale. Conversely, surface tension and capillary forces are more dominant at the microscale; these forces can be used for a variety of tasks, such as passively pumping fluids in microchannels, filtering various analytes, precisely patterning surfaces with user-defined substrates, and forming monodisperse droplets in multiphase fluid streams for a variety of applications.

ANFF-Q has full suites of instruments and facilities for the creation, testing and analysis of microfluidic devices.

Examples of use

Microfluidics can be used to demonstrate physical and chemical properties of liquids and gases at the microscale. Microfluidics can also be used for biological analysis and the creation of devices for applications such as lab-on-a-chip.

The use of diverse materials for microfluidics chips such as polymers (e.g. PDMS), ceramics (e.g. glass), semi-conductors (e.g. silicon) and metal is currently possible because of the development of specific processes: deposition and electrodeposition, etching, bonding, injection moulding, embossing and soft lithography. These materials make it possible to design microfluidic chips with features such as specific optical characteristics, biological or chemical compatibility, and electrosensing. PDMS and soft lithography based microfluidics allow researchers to rapidly build prototypes and test their applications.

Purpose:

The development of Bio-MEMS.

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

PC2 Lab, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Lien Chau

Microfluidic controller MFCS-FLEX-8C-1000

Specifications/resolution:

8 independent channels with positive pressure from 0 up to 1 000 mbar at 20 psi of compressed air pressure, two Fluiwell-4C-2 ml with 4 vials of 2 ml each, to pressurise microfluidics device. The system is also equipped with Flowell equipment configured with 3 channels to characterise the flow rate in microfluidic channels from 2 nl/min up to 7 µl/min. It has high stability (<0.1%) and instantaneous response time (<200 ms) with high reliability and quality.

Microfluidic valve controller

Specifications/resolution:

24 channel system built on the platform supplied by Dr. Rafael Gómez-Sjöberg, Quake Lab, Stanford University. All 24 channels can be controlled independently for certain microfluidic applications where microvalves are used for plumbing of microchannels.

Mitos duo xs-pump

The Mitos duo xs-pump is operated using an intuitive twist and click knob and display or by using a PC with free software. The Mitos duo xs-pump provides pulse-free flow using advanced electronics to remove the pulsation from the stepper motor drive. This is required for microfluidic applications where pulsation from the stepper motor can affect performance. The choice of flow modes allows simple or complex flow control.

The pump has two syringes and two multi-port valves allowing it to be configured in a number of ways. The pump can be used as a “one to many”, “many to one” or as a one continuous flow because each port can be used in aspirating from or dispensing to.

Specifications/resolution:

It can be configured into 2 refilling flows or 1 continuous flow with a wide flow rate range of 0.1 µl/min to 10 ml/min.

Mitos camera and microscope system

The Mitos camera and a microscope system is a high quality and flexible solution for general microscopy and image capturing in microfluidic applications.

It features an easy to use microscope with a wide zoom range and a long working distance. The Dolomite microscope stage is designed to accommodate all types of microfluidic chips and enables the user to quickly locate and observe the area of interest.

Specifications/resolution:

Image capture at speeds of over 1090 fps via firewire link to a desktop PC at resolution of 160 x 96 pixels and 290 fps at a moderate resolution of 320 x 240 pixels. Illumination is at 150 W with alternative fibre optic light guides for different lighting options.


nanoscribe2Nanoscribe

The Nanoscribe Photonic Professional GT is an advanced 2 photon 3D lithography system that allows structures to be printed with a building block as small as 100 nm in size. A wide range of photoresists can be written to, in addition to a number of substrates ranging from coverslips to 5” square masks. The precision stage control allows intricate structures such as photonic crystals or meta-materials to be easily fabricated. In addition, larger structures can be written such as microfluidic channels allowing novel channel shapes to be easily constructed.

Examples of use:

  • Photonic crystals
  • 3D projections
  • Microfluidics
  • Cell scaffolds
  • Bio mimicry

Material systems:

Polymers

Scale/volume:

Range of substrates from cover slips and microscope slides up to 4” silicon wafer and 5” square.

Specifications:

Structures can be built with a minimum voxel size of 100 nm x 350 nm.

Model:

Nanoscribe Photonic Professional GT

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

Class 1 000 cleanroom, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Doug Mair


oxygen-plasma-cleanerOxygen plasma cleaner

Plasma cleaning involves the removal of impurities and contaminants from surfaces through the use of an energetic plasma or dielectric barrier discharge plasma created from gaseous species. ANFF-Q’s oxygen plasma cleaner can be employed for plasma surface cleaning and surface treatment for various application fields, including materials science, polymer science, biomedical materials, microfluidics, optics, microscopy, and dental and medical research.

Examples of use:

Surface cleaning, sterilisation, activation, energy alteration, and preparation for bonding and adhesion (such as PDMS device fabrication); surface treatment of polymers and biomaterials through activation, grafting and surface coating; modification of surface chemistry—e.g. contact angle measurements on plasma-treated glass and polymer materials show enhanced surface wettability.

Purpose:

Nanoscale surface cleaning and surface activation.

Material systems:

Silicon, glass, PDMS, etc.

Scale/volume:

Up to 4 inch substrate.

Specifications/resolution:

Oxygen plasma, power 10 – 30 W.

Model:

Harrick Plasma expanded plasma cleaner (PDC-001 and PDC-002)

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

PC2 Laboratory, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Lien Chau


Photolithography

Photolithography allows patterning of substrates for a wide range of applications such as MEMs, optics and microfluidics. Our setup consists of a collection of tools including spinners, hotplates, mask aligners, UV flood source and fume cupboard.  All glassware is provided and photoresists can be ordered through the facility. The setup has been further enhanced with the installation of an advanced photolithography station (colloquially known as TARDIS – The Advanced Resist Development Integration System). This is a new fume cupboard with integrated spinner, hotplate (with ramping and lift pins) and developer all from Brewer Scientific.

photolithography-az-photoresist-stream-tardis2AZ photoresist stream – St Lucia campus

Examples of use:

High resolution lithography for the following processes:

  • Metal lift off process
  • Dry etch masking
  • Wet etch masking

Material systems:

AZ photoresists only—not AZ40XT.

Scale/volume:

4”, 6” round and (5” and 7” square for the developer).

Specifications/resolution:

Spinner (Brewer 200X): up to 10 000 RPM with edge bead removal and backside rinse.

Hotplate (Brewer 1300X):  0 to 400 °C with lift pins.

Developer (Brewer 200XD): spray development with AZ400 and AZ726.

Mask Aligner (EVG620): front side and backside alignment.

UV Flood Source (OAI): UV exposure – no alignment.

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

Class 10 000 cleanroom and class 1 000 cleanroom, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Doug Mair


photolithpgraphy-su8-photoresist-stream-class-10-000-cleanroomSU8 photoresist stream – Long Pocket campus

Examples of use:

SU8 microfluidic moulds to support clean soft lithography process.

Purpose:

Create SU8 structures for microfluidics and MEMs.

Material systems:

Range of SU8 polymers.

Scale/volume:

4”, 6” round substrates.

Specifications/resolution:

Spinner (Brewer 200X):  up to 10 000 RPM.

Mask Aligner (Neutronix): Front side alignment.

Hotplate:  0 to 200 °C.

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

Class 10 000 cleanroom, Level 3, Pandanus Building (#1022), Long Pocket

Instrument Contact:

Doug Mair


photolithography-su8-photoresist-streamSU8 photoresist stream – St Lucia campus

Examples of use:

  • SU8 Microfluidic Moulds
  • Dry etch masking (SU8 and AZ40XT)

Purpose:

Create SU8 structures for microfluidics and MEMs.

Material systems:

  • Range of SU8 polymers
  • AZ40XT

Scale/volume:

4”, 6” round substrates.

Specifications/resolution:

Spinner (Brewer 200X): up to 10 000 RPM with edge bead removal—dedicated for SU8.

Mask Aligner (EVG620): Front side and backside alignment.

UV Flood Source (OAI): UV exposure—no alignment.

Hotplate:  0 to 200 °C.

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

Class 10 000 cleanroom and class 1 000 cleanroom, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Doug Mair


Silanisation dessicators

Treatment of surfaces to change how fluids interact with them is a critical step in constructing useful microfluidics devices, especially those used in biological applications. Silanisation is the generic term applied to the formation of organosilane monolayers on substrates. These monolayers can be subsequently modified to produce a surface with a specific functionality.

ANFF-Q has two dedicated silanisation bell jar dessicators from ProSciTech, allowing the silanisation process to be performed simply and easily.

Examples of use:

Silanisation increases hydrophobicity and can be used in cell culturing to reduce adherence of cells to flask walls.

Silanising the surface of a mould (PDMS Master) is important to prevent PDMS adhering to the master, which would make it more difficult to release the mould and potentially damage the master.

Purpose:

Modification of substrates for microfluidic purposes, PDMS device fabrication and surface modification for biological application of microfluidic devices.

Material systems:

Organic, inorganic and biological.

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

PC2 Lab, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Class 10 000 cleanroom, Level 3, Pandanus Building (#1022), Long Pocket

Instrument Contact:

Lien Chau


soft-lithographySoft lithography

Soft lithography can process a wide range of elastomeric materials which are mechanically soft. This process is well suited for gels, polymers, and organic monolayers. However, PDMS has been extensively used for the applications of soft lithography because of its properties including low toxicity, versatile surface chemistry, low cost, biocompatibility, chemical inertness, and mechanical flexibility. Preparing PDMS devices is a very straightforward and rapid process.

ANFF-Q has fully equipped soft lithography suites at its AIBN and Long Pocket locations. The Long Pocket soft lithography suite is located within a class 10 000 cleanroom, allowing our clients to fabricate advanced microfluidic devices from start to finish within a dedicated clean environment, ensuring the entire process is dust free.

Examples of use

Soft lithography can be used for microfluidics device fabrication, bonding and micromoulding.

Related equipment:

Oven and hotplates for curing
Silanisation dessicators for surface treatment
Mixers for mixing and degassing
Vacuum pumps for degassing
Spin coater for deposition of PDMS thin film

Purpose:

PDMS device fabrication and surface modification for biological application of microfluidic devices.

Material systems:

Organic, inorganic and biological.

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

PC2 Lab, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Class 10 000 cleanroom, Level 3, Pandanus Building (#1022), Long Pocket

Instrument Contact:

Lien Chau


spin-coaters2Spin coaters

Spin coating is a technique used to apply uniform thin films to flat substrates. A sample diluted in a moderate boiling point material is applied to a substrate that is undergoing rotation.

Spin coaters can be used to apply thin polymeric films to silicon wafers in the development of soft-resists in the photolithography process. The thickness of films that are applied can be less than 10 nm and are governed by the concentration of the polymeric solution applied and the rotation speed.

ANFF-Q has a Brewer Science spin coater for SU8 and an APT Polos spin coater for PDMS that take various wafer geometries from 10 mm to 6” in diameter.

Purpose:

For spin coating of photoresist and polymers on glass and silicon wafer and other substrates.

Material systems:

Positive and negative photoresist and other polymers.

Scale/volume:

Wafer size up to 150 mm (6 inches).

Specifications/resolution:

Chemical resistant spin bowl and body, manual operation, closing lid and is fully programmable with alignment wafer tool.

Model:

APT Polos spin coater

Brewer Science CEE 200X spin coater

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

Class 10 000 cleanroom, Level 3, Pandanus Building (#1022), Long Pocket

Instrument Contact:

Doug Mair


ultimaker-2-3d-printer2Ultimaker 2 Extended+ 3D printer

The Ultimaker 2 Extended+ is a desktop fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printer. The Ultimaker 2 Extended+ uses an open filament system so you are able to use any kind of filament you want to achieve precisely the finish you’re after. And due to the interchangeable nozzles, you can go from 800 µm all the way down to a finely detailed 150 µm in lateral resolution with a layer thickness between 20 µm and 600 µm. This gives you the freedom to create really fast drafts, detailed prints and everything in between.

Examples of use

The Ultimaker 2 Extended+ can be used in prototyping and part design as well as to create niche items for immediate use. Uses range from biomedical applications through to parts manufacture and jewellery.

Purpose:

To create complicated 3D structures.

Material systems:

Open filament system; optimised for PLA, ABS, CPE, CPE+, PC, Nylon and TPU 95A.

Scale/volume:

Build volume: 223 × 223 × 305 mm

Specifications/resolution:

Layer thickness: 20 – 600 µm

Lateral resolution: 150 um to 800 um

Build speed: up to 24 mm3/s

Travel speed: up to 300 mm/s

Model:

Ultimaker 2 Extended+

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

PC2 Lab, Level 2E, AIBN (Bldg #75), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Lien Chau


UV–ozone cleaner

The MBRAUN MB-UV-O3 cleaner is an integrated system for UV ozone cleaning of semiconductor and opti­cal surfaces. This process provides a clean, hydrocarbon-free optical sur­face with significantly improved thin film and UV resin adhesion character­istics.

Applying ozone and UV light simul­taneously, results in a highly effec­tive removal of residual organic and carbon contamination down to con­tact angles of 5 degrees (depending on initial cleaning and substrate material).

ANFF-Q’s UV–ozone cleaner is housed within our encapsulation glove box.

Examples of use

The UV–ozone cleaner has a number of applications, including:

  • Surface cleaning
  • Preparation of surfaces for thin film deposition and surface treatment
  • UV curing
  • Surface sterilization
  • Improving surface hydrophilicity
  • Removal of surface monolayers

Purpose:

Preparation of surfaces.

Material systems:

Organics, metals and dielectrics.

Scale/volume:

Substrate size up to 150 mm x 150 mm.

Specifications/resolution:

The control unit allows you to set the pro­cess (irradiation) time from 1 to 999.9 minutes while an integrated flow meter is used to adjust the process gas flow during the cleaning process. Once the pre-set irradiation time has ended, the oxygen flow is automati­cally shut off and the process cham­ber is purged with nitrogen until all process gases have been removed. Integrated safety interlocks are pro­vided to shut off the UV radiation if the door is opened during the process or if the exhaust is interrupted.

Wavelength: main peaks at 184.9 nm and 253.7 nm.

Model:

MBRAUN MB-UV-O3-Cleaner

Site:

The University of Queensland

Location:

Room 910, Level 9, COPE (Bldg #68), St Lucia

Instrument Contact:

Kai-Yu Liu